Short Sales Help

In our current economy 2 our of 10 homeowners are having problems meeting their mortgage obligations. There are any number of reasons for this but the most common are loss of job, illness, relocation or divorce. With few options other than foreclosure, bankruptcy or a short sale people have a dour outlook.

For many people one of the options that provides the least damage to their personal lives and their credit report would be to pursue a short sale. 

What is a Short Sale?

A short sale can be an excellent solution for homeowners who need to sell, and who owe more on their homes than they are worth. In the past, it was rare for a bank or lender to accept a short sale. Today, however, due to overwhelming market changes, banks and lenders have become much more negotiable when it comes to these transactions. Recent changes in corporate policy and the Obama administration have also improved the chances of getting a short sale approved.

But to be technical, here's a more official definition:

  • A homeowner is 'short' when the amount owed on his/her property is higher than current market value.
  • A short sale occurs when a negotiation is entered into with the homeowner's mortgage company (or companies) to accept less than the full balance of the loan at closing. A buyer closes on the property, and the property is then 'sold short' of the total value of the mortgage.

For homeowners to qualify for a short sale, they must fall into all of the following circumstances:

  • Financial Hardship – There is a situation causing you to have trouble affording your mortgage.
  • Monthly Income Shortfall – In other words: "You have more month than money." A lender will want to see that you cannot afford, or soon will not be able to afford your mortgage.
  • Insolvency – The lender will want to see that you do not have significant liquid assets that would allow you to pay down your mortgage.

This seems simple enough, but it is a complicated process that takes the expertise of experienced professionals. Together, we can identify all possible options and, if possible, I can assist you in the quick execution of a short sale transaction.

What is a CDPE?

A Certified Distressed Property Expert® is a real estate professional with specific understanding of the complex issues confronting the real estate industry, and the foreclosure avoidance options available to homeowners. Through comprehensive training and experience, CDPEs are able to provide solutions for homeowners facing hardships in today’s market, specifically short sales.

The prospect of foreclosure can be financially and emotionally devastating, and often homeowners proceed without guidance of any kind. The developers of the CDPE Designation believe that the best course of action for a homeowner in distress is to speak with a well-informed, licensed real estate professional. They have the tools needed to help homeowners find the best solution for their situation. Often, when other options have been exhausted, CDPEs can help homeowners avoid foreclosure through the efficient execution of a short sale.

While enduring financial difficulties is challenging for any family, the process of finding a qualified real estate professional should not be. Selecting an agent with the CDPE Designation ensures you are dealing with a professional trained to address your specific needs

CDPEs don’t merely assist in selling properties, they serve and help save their clients in need.

 

There may be somebody around you that is facing financial distress and possible foreclosure. I may be able to hel them with a properly managed short sale.

Visit my special Short Sale website, www.ctshortsalesilva.com for additional information on avoiding foreclosure.

Blog Posts with Short Sales Information 

Avoiding Foreclosure in Connecticut Means doing More than Sitting

Tips on Buying a Short Sale Home

The Banks Doesn't Want to Foreclose on your home

A Waterbury CT Short Sale Successfully Taken to Closing

How Much Will a Short Sale Cost Me?

Banks Are Encouraging Short Sales In Central Connecticut

 

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